What White Supremacists Know

Enlightening.

Counter Information

klu-cooks
The violent theft of land and capital is at the core of the U.S. experiment: the U.S. military got its start in the wars against Native Americans.

By Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

November 27, 2018 Information Clearing House   The United States has been at war every day since its founding, often covertly and often in several parts of the world at once. As ghastly as that sentence is, it still does not capture the full picture. Indeed, prior to its founding, what would become the United States was engaged—as it would continue to be for more than a century following—in internal warfare to piece together its continental territory. Even during the Civil War, both the Union and Confederate armies continued to war against the nations of the Diné and Apache, the Cheyenne and the Dakota, inflicting hideous massacres upon civilians and forcing their relocations. Yet when considering…

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THE ABA WOMENS RIOT November 18th, 1929.

Historical pictorial, I had to reblog.

Honesty News

Excerpts:

”REMEMBERING NWAYEREUWA, NWANNEDIA, IKONNIA & NWUGO.

The four gallant women who lead the revolution that stops taxation of women.

I’m sure 90% of Africans, Nigerians and mainly people of Igbo origin who read the headline of this post will be like who the hell are these people?

Yes we wouldn’t know them because we’ve been busy learning about their Mother Theresa and the fraudulent story of Mary Slessor.

The riot (Revolution)

On this day 89 years ago, in the morning of November 18th 1929, a man called Emereuwa upon the directive of his boss Okugo the warrant chief, walked into the compound of a widow called Nwanyereuwa, ordered her for a census of all her livestock and household. The widow Nwanyereuwa knowing the census will determined how much she will be taxed by the British colonial government, embittered, shouted on Emereuwa “was your widowed mother at home counted?” An…

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New Book on the Indigenous People of St. Lucia

Hi.

Repeating Islands

A new book by St Lucian researcher Sylvester Clauzel, Indigenous Peoples of St Lucia—Nou Se Kalinago, aims at debunking many of the most ignorant myths about the indigenous peoples of the region that persist so many centuries after early European travelers and settlers first invented them. Here are some excerpts from a recent review in the St Lucia Star:
“The Taino dominated the Greater Antilles by the time of the arrival of the Europeans around 1500 A.D.,” writes Clauzel. The second group of people called (and still call) themselves the Kalinago and began moving into the region around 600 A.D. “They were not raiders and savages as many historians described them but traders who also settled in the islands,” Clauzel’s book explains. This conclusion matches newer research which indicates that the Amerindian people of the islands were much more sophisticated than the simple savages that early Europeans painted…

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