The competition for your mind

When the Egyptian Mohammed Salah won the 2017 African Footballer of the Year, the internet went into an uproar. Why? Some Africans did not think Salah was ‘African’ enough to have earned the title. This is certainly not the first time, and probably won’t be the last, that a North African’s “Africanness” was questioned. In July 2015, The Guardian reported that […]

via Are North Africans really Africans? — AIWA!

Pan-Africanism is a lofty goal

There are ideas that will not die regardless of the passage of time; their power and reach is of such magnitude. One of those ideas is Pan-Africanism. The idea, history and cause of Pan-Africanism is marked, celebrated, and reaffirmed each year on African Liberation Day, which in 2018 falls on Friday 25 May. On this day African communities, […]

via Pan-Africanism: More Than an Idea the Key to Africa’s Liberation — Astute News

The African Intellectual perspective

African history has gone through many incarnations as an academic discipline. Glen Ncube Lecturer: History; Humanities, University of Pretoria Disclosure statement Glen Ncube does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond the academic appointment […]

via African history is a discipline on the rise – and one that raises many questions — Specimen-news.com

A Rothschild lineage Founder

Many thanks to Peter Jordens for sharing links regarding Alexander Hamilton as a Jewish founding father. Most of the articles listed below refer to Andrew Porwancher’s forthcoming book, The Jewish Founding Father: Alexander Hamilton’s Hidden Life (Harvard University Press, 2019). Alexander Hamilton was born in Nevis, and grew up in St. Croix (then a territory […]

via Alexander Hamilton’s Jewish Caribbean Roots — Repeating Islands

Peeling back the onion

After the abolition of slavery, Britain paid millions in compensation – but every penny of it went to slave owners, and nothing to those they enslaved. We must stop overlooking the brutality of British history. By Kris Manjapra for London’s Guardian. On 3 August 1835, somewhere in the City of London, two of Europe’s most famous bankers came […]

via When will Britain face up to its crimes against humanity? — Repeating Islands